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Porn Users Forum » Proper Grammar? Off-Topic!
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02-17-13  01:57pm - 591 days Original Post - #1
messmer (137)
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Proper Grammar? Off-Topic!

Times have changed quite a bit, and grammatical errors (in my day) have now become quite commonplace and accepted. It is not my intention to play grammar or spelling police, I always found this a bit elitist.

I am also aware that, most likely, I make quite a few mistakes myself, but one thing has me baffled and I am not sure if I have been using it incorrectly all my life or if things have changed on me.

And that is the use of the word *off* in certain contexts! I have always used it as in, get off me, while many, if not most, will say get *off of* me.

Here is the latest example from a reputable site with reputable journalists:

"the International Olympic Committee had voted wrestling, the sport in which he won his gold medal at the 2008 Olympics, *off of* the 2020 Olympic program."

It sounds so wrong to me but could *I* have been wrong for the past fifty-six years? I won't get upset if you say *yes*! I simply need to know and I don't feel like going to Google.

02-17-13  02:29pm - 591 days #2
jberryl69 (12)
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Well Messmer, I think the journalist is using it in the wrong context. I'm pretty sure just "off" would be correct in that sentence since both are prepositions. Just a simple mistake when it was proof read. If it ain't grits, it must be a Yankee.

If you're going to lay her head over the pool table and fuck her throat, get your fucking hand off her throat!

02-17-13  03:23pm - 591 days #3
Drooler (218)
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Well, seems that "off of," when tagged on to a suitable verb, basically means "remove." I remember the days of reality tv, when people would get voted off of an island. Or was that "off an island"? Seems the "of" is optional.

Or is it? Compare:
We got him off the boat.
We got him off of the boat.


Are there any differences in nuance to any of the speakers of the varieties of English here at PU? Would one imply "helping him" and the other "making him fucking leave the damn boat"? Or is there simply no difference?


Originally Posted by messmer:


It is not my intention to play grammar or spelling police, I always found this a bit elitist.


Uh-oh! Comma splice! Good DNA, good T 'n A.

If the scene is going to be any good, the title for it had better have an exclamation mark.

02-17-13  04:00pm - 591 days #4
messmer (137)
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Originally Posted by jberryl69:


Well Messmer, I think the journalist is using it in the wrong context. I'm pretty sure just "off" would be correct in that sentence since both are prepositions. Just a simple mistake when it was proof read.


I would have thought it to be a simple mistake as well, JB, but I come across this every day. In newspapers, magazines, stories I read. It always seems to be *I took the book off of the shelf* rather than *I took the book off the shelf*. Is there a right context where off of is correct? I am honestly confused.

02-17-13  04:06pm - 591 days #5
messmer (137)
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Originally Posted by Drooler:


Well, seems that "off of," when tagged on to a suitable verb, basically means "remove." I remember the days of reality tv, when people would get voted off of an island. Or was that "off an island"? Seems the "of" is optional.

Or is it? Compare:
We got him off the boat.
We got him off of the boat.


Are there any differences in nuance to any of the speakers of the varieties of English here at PU? Would one imply "helping him" and the other "making him fucking leave the damn boat"? Or is there simply no difference?


So you don't know for sure either, do you, Drooler?

Re. the comma splice, also a

Still in connection with grammar. All of a sudden I find myself checking every damn word I write for errors. Should have never started on the subject!

02-17-13  04:35pm - 591 days #6
Capn (28)
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The one that always grates with me is 'meet up'.

If that is good, why not 'meet down' or 'meet left' or 'meet right.' ?

I don't see the need of anything other than the verb 'meet'.

It doesn't need what would normally be termed a preposition.

Cap'n. Admiral of the PU Hindenburg. 2009 PU Award
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( I would have preferred it to be Helpful Post of the Year for Guys who Hate 'Retail Therapy' ) :0/
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02-17-13  04:57pm - 591 days #7
graymane (31)
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Too bad HeatherMcxxx, ain't around.
With her teaching credentials and a sharp eye for ferreting out grammatical faux pas, I can say with hard experience that she'd be on this thread like spots on a leopard.
Subject to opening something without being asked,, She even had khan setting in the corner wearing a dunce head-gear.
Correcting me on a very tame error, the exchange among members that followed took took off like a jet.
The unstoppable thread I can only now guess is somewhere in the "outta-limits."

I predit you've started something here, pard. We all might be in for a long ride on this one.

02-18-13  10:18am - 590 days #8
messmer (137)
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Originally Posted by graymane:


Too bad HeatherMcxxx, ain't around.
With her teaching credentials and a sharp eye for ferreting out grammatical faux pas, I can say with hard experience that she'd be on this thread like spots on a leopard.
Subject to opening something without being asked,, She even had khan setting in the corner wearing a dunce head-gear.
Correcting me on a very tame error, the exchange among members that followed took took off like a jet.
The unstoppable thread I can only now guess is somewhere in the "outta-limits."

I predit you've started something here, pard. We all might be in for a long ride on this one.


I miss HeatherMcTripleX myself, graymane. She was a breath of fresh air and made me feel younger. I also miss our Dominatrix from the U.K. I liked to see women voicing their opinions, likes and dislikes in this forum. But I guess the love of porn is still mainly a man's thing.

02-18-13  10:34am - 590 days #9
lk2fireone (194)
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Language is supposed to be an evolving organism. That means, I think, that over time it changes. "Dude" used to mean a newcomer to the Western United States. Today, it means something like "man, or you", as in "hey, dude".

In high school and in college, proper English was something to learn and use. But most people today just seem to use colloquial, nonstandard American English.

Maybe in the legal system or in business contracts there are precise meanings in the way words are supposed to be used. But in everyday life, I doubt most people pay too much attention to the exact rules of grammar that were taught 30 or 40 years ago.

02-18-13  01:38pm - 590 days #10
messmer (137)
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Originally Posted by lk2fireone:


Language is supposed to be an evolving organism. That means, I think, that over time it changes. "Dude" used to mean a newcomer to the Western United States. Today, it means something like "man, or you", as in "hey, dude".

In high school and in college, proper English was something to learn and use. But most people today just seem to use colloquial, nonstandard American English.

Maybe in the legal system or in business contracts there are precise meanings in the way words are supposed to be used. But in everyday life, I doubt most people pay too much attention to the exact rules of grammar that were taught 30 or 40 years ago.


Can't disagree with you there, lk2fireone. I have seen a huge change in the English language in my life time. There are words my generation had never heard of, there are changes in meaning as in your *dude,* there are changes in the way words are pronounced with the emphasis all of a sudden on different syllables, but there is also a wrong kind of change where English (especially written English) is being butchered and folks are not even aware of doing so.

And I still haven't seen an answer if *off of* is sometimes right and acceptable, or if it is always wrong.

02-18-13  03:36pm - 590 days #11
Dracula (5)
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It does sound off. The real problem is that other readers will think this is normal and compound the issue. Like a virus, it will spread. A true neck-lover.

02-18-13  07:56pm - 590 days #12
PinkPanther (46)
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http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?...0120307154328AAwQF9g

Here's a full discussion of this topic. I use "off of" and feel quite comfortable being in the company of William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Harry S. Truman, and James Thurber in doing so. I don't see any reason to stop using it. It's obviously not a recent speech invention.

02-19-13  03:04am - 589 days #13
turboshaft (24)
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Originally Posted by messmer:


Here is the latest example from a reputable site with reputable journalists:

"the International Olympic Committee had voted wrestling, the sport in which he won his gold medal at the 2008 Olympics, *off of* the 2020 Olympic program."

It sounds so wrong to me but could *I* have been wrong for the past fifty-six years? I won't get upset if you say *yes*! I simply need to know and I don't feel like going to Google.


It doesn't sound that wrong to me, though it doesn't sound that right either. But even if the writer had put "voted wrestling [...] off the 2020 Olympic program" it would still sound kinda weird to me--"voted out" or just "removed" sounds clearer. "Voted off" sounds like they're channeling Survivor, as an island is an actual tangible thing that you could vote something or someone off of. That's my pet peeve .

But I"m no grammar Gestapo, and I generally take issue with people's arguments and/or tone, rather than whatever piddly little speaking and writing mistakes they may make. It's why I got in such a huff over the Jessie Rogers thread a couple weeks back. Her stupid-ass argument, which seems to be made every time someone even looks at a gun wrong, was my beef, not her grammar or anything else she may have messed up on.

Also, I found another "off of" link that you may find interesting: motivatedgrammar.wordpress.com/2012/07/31/on-off-of/. "It's incredibly obvious, isn't it? A foreign substance is introduced into our precious bodily fluids without the knowledge of the individual. Certainly without any choice. That's the way your hardcore Commie works." - Gen. Jack D. Rippper, Dr. Stranglove

02-19-13  09:58am - 589 days #14
messmer (137)
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Originally Posted by turboshaft:


It doesn't sound that wrong to me, though it doesn't sound that right either. But even if the writer had put "voted wrestling [...] off the 2020 Olympic program" it would still sound kinda weird to me--"voted out" or just "removed" sounds clearer. "Voted off" sounds like they're channeling Survivor, as an island is an actual tangible thing that you could vote something or someone off of. That's my pet peeve .

But I"m no grammar Gestapo, and I generally take issue with people's arguments and/or tone, rather than whatever piddly little speaking and writing mistakes they may make. It's why I got in such a huff over the Jessie Rogers thread a couple weeks back. Her stupid-ass argument, which seems to be made every time someone even looks at a gun wrong, was my beef, not her grammar or anything else she may have messed up on.

Also, I found another "off of" link that you may find interesting: motivatedgrammar.wordpress.com/2012/07/31/on-off-of/.


Thanks, turbo. Quite an enlightening url. I guess what it boils down to is that in some locations off of sounds right while in other locations it doesn't. I had no idea that it was a pet peeve of so many. I wouldn't call mine a pet peeve, off of simply doesn't sound right to me and I wanted to know. Edited on Feb 19, 2013, 10:12am

02-19-13  10:00am - 589 days #15
jberryl69 (12)
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Originally Posted by turboshaft:


Also, I found another "off of" link that you may find interesting: motivatedgrammar.wordpress.com/2012/07/31/on-off-of/.

If it ain't grits, it must be a Yankee.

If you're going to lay her head over the pool table and fuck her throat, get your fucking hand off her throat!

02-19-13  10:07am - 589 days #16
messmer (137)
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Originally Posted by PinkPanther:


http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?...0120307154328AAwQF9g

Here's a full discussion of this topic. I use "off of" and feel quite comfortable being in the company of William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Harry S. Truman, and James Thurber in doing so. I don't see any reason to stop using it. It's obviously not a recent speech invention.


They probably all had bad editors or speech writers, PP!

Nah, just kidding because I did not come to fight but to find out for sure. I think it is safe to say now that if you are used to hearing and speaking off of, it is right, while to others like me it will keep sounding wrong, but that both sides have a point.

So I'll call it a tie. Thanks for the participation, guys.

02-19-13  04:14pm - 589 days #17
Capn (28)
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Surely shouldn't 'off of' be simply 'from'?

Cap'n. Admiral of the PU Hindenburg. 2009 PU Award
Hilarious Post of the Year 2010 PU Award
( I would have preferred it to be Helpful Post of the Year for Guys who Hate 'Retail Therapy' ) :0/
Sanity is in the eye of the Beholder!

02-20-13  10:16am - 588 days #18
messmer (137)
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Originally Posted by Capn:


Surely shouldn't 'off of' be simply 'from'?

Cap'n.


I think that might work, Cap'n!

02-20-13  10:33am - 588 days #19
lk2fireone (194)
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Today's poll made me think about the "proper" use of log.
Do you log-in to a site, or do you log-on?
Do you log-out from a site, or log-off?
Or maybe the correct use is to log-out?

In today's world, I don't really know what is correct. So I just use or write whatever combination comes into my head when I do my logging. Makes me think I am a Canadian lumberjack, who is using my keyboard instead of an axe whenever I am forced to do my logging. Yeash, Canuck, the home of Paul Bunyan, my childhood hero.

Wait, wasn't Paul Bunyan from the U.S.?

Maybe they should do a superhero movie about Paul Bunyan.

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